South African President’s death: A sad day for the world

SANTA CLARA, Calif.

— South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma was found dead Saturday in a luxury apartment in Manhattan’s Park Avenue neighborhood, authorities said.

Zuma, 61, had been hospitalized for more than a week following complications from pneumonia, and his body was found in a separate room.

The cause of death was not immediately known.

Zumaras funeral will be held Monday, the country’s state-run broadcaster SABC said.

The South African government had not released a statement on the president’s death.

Zulu-language news outlets, including the countrys main public broadcaster, SABC, said Zuma had been found by police officers and paramedics in his bedroom with a gunshot wound to the head.

The agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Zumas office said the president was hospitalized with a chest wound after being hit by a car and was not responding to requests for further information.

The countrys news media were not immediately able to confirm the president had been shot.

A white man was also arrested after the shooting, the New York police said in a tweet.

Police had responded to reports of a white male, identified by police as Zuma’s brother-in-law, at the apartment in the Flatiron neighborhood of the Upper East Side of Manhattan late Friday, according to a tweet from the New Jersey State Police.

The police department said that Zuma and the suspect had not been cooperative.

The suspect had fled and was last seen walking away from a nearby bar.

Zuniga was a former president of the country that was known for its harsh policies on the nations black population, including a 1994 coup d’état that overthrew Zuma.

He was ousted in the 2014 election after protests by the ruling African National Congress, or ANC, that toppled his party’s longtime leader, Nelson Mandela.

The president had criticized the ANC for its role in the coup, and was later charged with treason and conspiracy.

He has maintained his innocence, saying the charges against him were politically motivated.

He served two terms in office and was widely regarded as a charismatic leader who transformed South Africa from a backward economy to a global power.

But he was forced out of office in 2015 by a court-ordered recall.

Zimba was also a vocal opponent of a controversial law that would have ended South Africas decades-long racial inequality.

The law, which was enacted in 2016, was the subject of a constitutional challenge.

The government had been accused of misusing the law, and had been blocked by the courts.

Zama was also widely seen as a strong opponent of President Donald Trump, whom he had praised during the 2016 election campaign.

In recent weeks, South Africa has been hit by several terrorist attacks, including last month’s assault on the presidential palace and the murder of an anti-apartheid activist by a white supremacist in Johannesburg.

The attacks have been attributed to the ANC, and some of its members have been charged with killing at least one of their opponents.